Luke 2:14

 

“Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.”
King James Version (KJV)


 View Chapter

 

 

Other Translations of Luke 2:14

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good wil towards men.
- King James Version (1611) - Compare to scan of original Luke chapter 2

"Glory to God in the highest, And on earth peace among men with whom He is pleased."
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Glory to God in the highest, And on earth peace among men in whom he is well pleased.
- American Standard Version (1901)

Glory to God in the highest, and on the earth peace among men with whom he is well pleased.
- Basic English Bible

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good pleasure in men.
- Darby Bible

Glory to God in the highest; and on earth peace to men of good will.
- Douay Rheims Bible

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will towards men.
- Webster's Bible

Glory be to God in the highest Heavens, And on earth peace among men who please Him!
- Weymouth Bible

Glory to God in the highest, on earth peace, good will toward men.
- World English Bible

and seiynge, Glorie be in the hiyeste thingis to God, and in erthe pees be to men of good wille.
- Wycliffe Bible

`Glory in the highest to God, and upon earth peace, among men -- good will.'
- Youngs Literal Bible


 

Juancho's comment on 2015-07-26 14:42:29:

Didn't know the gospel acclamation originated with THAT verse.

 

MockingBird's comment on 2015-02-08 05:15:58:

It looks as though much of the world is : Who can I lie to : cheat out of : steal from : how can I please myself today !!! Glory to God in the highest : He has sent peace into the earth through Jesus Christ and He is the Goodwill toward men. Praise God : Notice - Goodwill : It was God 's Good and His will to give us Jesus Christ.

 

Brad Holland's comment on 2012-12-28 01:40:24:

The difference in the King James Version of Luke 2:14 to the Vulgate is worth studying. Wikipedia says it is based on inclusion or omission of a "genitive" vowel at the end of Greek versions of the verse. I have not yet found decisively strong evidence supporting one translation over the other or (alternatively) allowing for both interpretations as would be possible if the original text was not explicit in it's use of language. I would be happy for information explaining the King James interpretation or translation of this verse.

 

J W Rock's comment on 2012-12-19 17:03:07:

In the Catholic and Luther versions of Luke 2.14, the Angels sing of God's peace directed to men of good will. A minor but significant variation not found in earlier versions of King James. Nich Wahr.

 


Add your comment

Viewing Mobile Version.
Switch to desktop version.